Financial Planning

Year-End Tax Tips for 2020

As we wrap up 2020, we are all looking forward to brighter and more COVID-free days ahead. Year-end tax planning has never been more crucial. This year brought new challenges that can impact your personal and financial situations – COVID-19, economic relief measures, and new tax laws. Now is the time to take a closer…

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New College Cost Data for 2020-2021 School Year

Every year, the College Board releases updated college cost data and trends in its annual report. Although costs can vary significantly depending on region of the country and college, the College Board publishes average cost figures, which are based on a survey of approximately 4,000 colleges across the country. Following are cost highlights for the…

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The Jobs Recovery: More Work to Be Done

In April 2020, the U.S. economy lost an astonishing 20.8 million jobs, by far the largest loss recorded in a single month dating back to 1939. To put this in perspective, the second largest monthly job loss was about 2 million in September 1945, when defense industries reduced production at the end of World War…

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IRA and Retirement Plan Limits for 2021

Many IRA and retirement plan limits are indexed for inflation each year. While some of the limits remain unchanged for 2021, other key numbers have increased. IRA contribution limits The maximum amount you can contribute to a traditional IRA or a Roth IRA in 2021 is $6,000 (or 100% of your earned income, if less),…

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The FAFSA and Your Income.

Your income from two years prior is what counts on the FAFSA. For example, the 2021-2022 FAFSA will rely on income information in your 2019 tax return. FAFSA for 2021-2022 Academic Year Opens on October 1.   The FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) for the 2021-2022 year opens on October 1, 2020. The…

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Student Loan Relief Extended Through End of Year

In March 2020, Congress passed the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act, which provided a six-month automatic payment suspension on federal student loans through September 30, 2020. In August, the president signed a memorandum to extend federal student loan relief through December 31, 2020. What does this mean for student loan borrowers? All…

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U.S. Government Sends Millions of Economic Impact Payments by Prepaid Debit Card

In May 2020, the IRS sent Economic Impact Payment (EIP) prepaid VISA debit cards to individuals who qualified for a stimulus payment under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act and didn’t receive a payment via direct deposit. How is the card activated? The Economic Impact Payment Card (EIP Card) arrives in a…

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2019 IRA Contribution Deadline Has Been Extended

Due to the coronavirus tax filing extension, there’s still time to make a regular IRA contribution for 2019. You have until your tax return due date (not including extensions) to contribute up to $6,000 for 2019 ($7,000 if you were age 50 or older on December 31, 2019). For most taxpayers, the contribution deadline for…

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Watch Out for Coronavirus Scams

Fraudsters and scam artists are always looking for new ways to prey on consumers. Now they are using the same tactics to take advantage of consumers’ heightened financial and health concerns over the coronavirus pandemic. Federal, state, and local law enforcement have begun issuing warnings on the surge of coronavirus scams and how consumers can…

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Small Businesses Eligible for Numerous Relief Programs During COVID-19 Crisis

Throughout March 2020, as it became increasingly evident that the economic impact from the COVID-19 pandemic would be both profound and prolonged, Congress passed several pieces of legislation with provisions to help small businesses shore up their coffers and keep employees on the payroll. Within a few weeks, initial funding for the two cornerstone programs,…

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